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Footnotes and other references

VIII. Cross references

Cross references refer readers to information contained in another part of the same text. In documents and publications, cross references to annexes, tables and figures and to other chapters, sections and paragraphs are normally given in parentheses in the text and are introduced by "see".

When the cross reference is to an entire chapter or section, either the chapter and section or the paragraph numbers should be given but not both. Cross references to pages should be avoided when possible.

Examples:

In many of the least developed countries, gender equality has improved in primary education but the gender disparities increase with the level of education (see annex II, table 4).

* * *

By the 1980s, these economies had switched to high-technology manufacturing (see chap. III, sect. B).

* * *

At the same meeting, the Committee adopted draft resolution A/C.2/60/L.67 (see para. 7).

Cross references after titles, subtitles and headings in documents are given in footnotes; asterisks or other symbols are used as indicators (see Footnote indicators/Footnotes indicated by asterisks and other symbols).

 

 
     
   
 


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